Getting Power Plants Off of California’s Beaches

If you have spent much time along California’s beaches, you will have come across an odd sight: conventionally-fired power plants perched on our shores.

The need for these beasts to be taking up our seashores has long since been eliminated by technology. What is more, California’s energy needs have been falling even as generation capacity has been rising with the addition of massive wind and solar plants. So why are utilities – including NRG – looking to build fossil-fuel fired plants along our shorelines?

Taking the McGrath Peaker run by NRG as an example, and acknowledging that none of the issues involved are simple, Werner Keller explains why these plants no longer make sense, and why the land they and their support infrastructure takes up should be returned to nature. You may not agree with Mr. Keller, but you must acknowledge that these plants are due for a re-think in light of California’s emerging energy picture.

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Author: David Wolf

An adviser to corporations and organizations on strategy, communications, and public affairs, David Wolf has been working and living in Beijing since 1995, and now divides his time between China and California. He also serves as a policy and industry analyst focused on innovative and creative industries, a futurist, and an amateur historian.

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