An Airfield Twixt Past and Future 


Pausing for lunch on a cold, windy day at the former George Air Force Base, this beautifully restored F-4C is my sole companion.

The base is a glorified industrial park attached to a parking lot for cast-off jetliners, an example of the “peace dividends” of dubious value that so many California communities have reaped since the fall of the Berlin Wall.

It does not take much of a sense of history to wonder, however, whether the dawn of the second Cold War might fortell a quickening in the future of this high-desert airbase.

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Ode to a California Airline

Twenty years from now, when my grandchildren ask me what it was like to fly on Virgin America, I will show them this video.

Virgin America will join PSA, AirCal, and Western Airlines as a piece of California aviation history when they are absorbed into Alaska Airlines.

Goodbye, all, and thank you for some of the best economy class experiences I have had in a lifetime of flying.

Friday at the Videos: Remembering When LA Airport Was in Glendale

Los Angeles airport was not always alongside the dunes in Westchester. Back when LAX was still a seaside bean field, Grand Central Terminal a few miles north of Downtown L.A. was where passengers landed in the Southland.

This three part video series tells the story of how Glendale was the cradle of commercial aviation and aerospace in Southern California. The series is a delight for both airplane buffs and history fans.

The Bigger Boeing Long Beach Story

Boeing is leaving Long Beach, and California is no longer in the business of manufacturing aircraft as it has done for over a century. It is the end of an era, and this video offers a glimpse at what was the final hope for the airframe assembly business in California.

One point of note in the video is that the reporter actually reached out to Governor Jerry Brown’s office to see if they were talking to Boeing about keeping an assembly facility open in Long Beach, but the office was gently evasive. If that has you scratching your head, that is because this reporter did not tell the whole story. Boeing still has around 18,000 employees in the state, a far cry from the heights of the Cold War, but still one of California’s largest employers.

All of this points to a larger fact. While aircraft are no longer flying out of factories in California, there is a large and thriving aerospace industry here still. According to A.T. Kearny, 203,000 direct jobs and 511,000 indirect jobs can be attributed to the aerospace industry in California, more than Hollywood and agriculture combined. The industry is a lot harder to see, but it is still there, even as airplane factories across the Southland fall under the wrecking ball.